Getting Political and Not Getting Political

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With election season ramping up and election day (Nov 5th) just around the corner, we (me/Jimmy, our Staff, and our Board of Directors) want to make sure everyone is well aware of the rules and policies in place that protect BBP from any 501c3 nonprofit violations. We also want to draw a distinction between getting involved politically by supporting causes, ordinances, and opportunities to advocate on behalf of the community we serve (all things we can and frequently do) and getting involved with endorsing, funding, and promoting individual political campaign efforts (something we can’t, don’t, and won’t do). Here is a copy of BBP’s official political guidelines adopted by BBP’s Board of Directors and discussed with all of BBP’s Staff.

BOISE BICYCLE PROJECT 

Political Guidelines and Policy

Boise Bicycle Project, as represented by its programs, employees, and Board Members may not:

  • Promote or campaign for or against a federal, state, or local political candidate.

  • Make donations to political campaigns.

  • Coordinate an event or release a report that highlights one party or candidate.

Boise Bicycle Project, as represented by its programs, employees, and Board Members may:

  • Conduct non-partisan voter education drives.

  • Sponsor non-partisan public forums for candidates to speak on issues.

  • Compile non-partisan voter guides  Distribute candidates’ answers to non-partisan questionnaires that address a wide range of issues.

PERSONAL OPINIONS/ACTIONS

Board Members and persons employed by the Boise Bicycle Project are free to express their opinions on political matters.  However, they are not to use official organization publications or events to do so. When speaking about their own views/opinions where the audience may not understand who an employee or board member may be representing, it is expected that the employee/board member makes it clear.


We hope this makes the upcoming election and BBP’s abilities to get involved, and not get involved, more clear. We are asking that our volunteers, members, and supporters be respectful of our staff when engaging in political discussions inside of BBP’s shop and at BBP events. Outside of the shop/BBP events and when talking with our Staff and our Board as individuals (not representing BBP), ask away. They are people just like anyone else.

Thank you for your understanding.

Jimmy Hallyburton

PRESERVATION BICYCLE # 9: 1976 Raleigh Super Course MK II

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This is a 1976 (43 years young) Raleigh Super Course MKII, hand built in the Carlton Factory in England. It has Reynolds 531 steel tubing (the good stuff), and the lug work (the joints that connect the tubes) especially where the top tube, seat tube and seat stays meet is simply incredible (see the photo below). Please come down and check this one out. The small details, the Huret rear derailleur, the French Nervar cranks… such a wonderful piece of bicycle history!

PRESERVATION BICYCLE NUMBER #9

MAKE: Raleigh Carlton

MODEL: Super Course MKII

YEAR/AGE: 1976

SIZE: 55CM 5’6 - 5’10 ( 5’8 WOULD PROBABLY BE PERFECT)

ADOPTION FEE: $50 (PLEASE! DON’T PART THIS BIKE OUT OR RESELL ON EBAY)

RECOMMENDED REPAIRS:

BASIC: Tires, tubes, new cables and housing, some work on the wheels and lots degreasing, regreasing should make this bike ridable. If you can salvage that vintage Brooks Leather Saddle, major props, but it might have to go. Pop a new chain on there, and have our mechanics teach you how to adjust the front and rear derailleurs. We’re talking $50 - $100 bucks and 3-4 hours of shop time here!

Pie in the Sky Deluxe Head Turner: A new 700c wheelset (currently 27 x 1 1/4) would make a big difference while allowing you to run a slightly fatter tire, and there’s a chance you might need to get some longer reach breaks to accommodate the slightly smaller wheel. A new/er Brooks Saddle might be necessary, but a refurb on the old one would be amazing if you can pull it off. Them, it’s really up to you. A small front rack with a handlebar bag (see this combo from Velo Orange) would really open up some possibility for longer rides. Now we’re talking about $150-250 of upgrades + the $50 adoption fee, which equals $300 for a bicycle that will make you smile and turn some heads for the rest of your life.

BICYCLE HISTORY:

Reynolds 531 tubing is made in England, and the frame was hand built in the Raleigh Carlton Factory in England. Not sure how it made its way to Boise. The original bike shop sticker is worn off, so you will need to do some investigating

WHAT OTHER STORIES CAN WE DISCOVER FROM THESE PICTURES?

WHO WILL ADOPT THIS PRESERVATION BICYCLE AND BECOME THE NINTH MEMBER OF BBP’S BICYCLE PRESERVATION SOCIETY?