PRESERVATION BICYCLE # 8: 1986 Trek Pro Series 560

1986 Trek Pro Series 560

This is a 1986 Trek Pro Series 560 with Reynolds 531 Tubing (the good stuff), and it is beyond beautiful. The lugwork (the joints that connect the tubes) are works of art, and the cable routing coming out of the chainstay into the rear derailleur is masterful. During the mid and early 80s, most of the really high quality Treks were hand built in Waterford Wisconsin, and this was their highest-of-high end. While there are a few scratches and paint chips, this bicycle is still in immaculate condition, still has all of the original components and likely belongs in a museum. But bicycles are made to be ridden, and this one is no exception.

PRESERVATION BICYCLE NUMBER #8

MAKE: Trek

MODEL: Pro Series 560

YEAR/AGE: 1986

SIZE: 54cm 5’5 - 5’10 ( 5’7 would probably be perfect)

ADOPTION FEE: $300 (PLEASE! DON’T PART THIS BIKE OUT OR Resell on EBAY)

RECOMMENDED REPAIRS:

BASIC: With new tubes and some chain lube, you could probably ride this bike out the door. Do yourself a favor and degrease, regrease, and adjust all of the bearings (hubs, bottom bracket, headset). Cables and housing probably need to be replaced, although you might be able to just lube the cables if you’re on a tight budget. Pop a new chain on there, and have our mechanics teach you how to adjust the front and rear derailleurs. We’re talking $50 bucks and 2 hours of shop time here! Unbelievable!

Pie in the Sky Deluxe Head Turner: There is certainly value in keeping things all original, but if you really are going to ride it a lot, and you should, do some upgrades to make it more comfortable. Start with the biggest tire that frame clearance allows (probably 700x25, maybe 28s), find taller stem or handlebar that gets you a little bit higher, and consider moving those downtube shifters to barend shifters. Those simple changes would make a big difference without taking to much from the original look. Now we’re talking about $150 of upgrades + the $300 adoption fee, which equals $450 for one of the best vintage racing bikes ever made.

BICYCLE HISTORY:

Reynolds 531 tubing is made in England, but the frame itself was definitely cut and brazed together by hand in Waterloo Wisconsin. It looks like the bicycle was assembled (components added to the frame) and purchased at Anaheim Schwinn in Anaheim, California. Not sure how it made its way to Boise, but there is no rust on it at all, so likely not much time on the coast. A few scratches and paint chips here and there, but it’s in incredible shape for a 33 year old bicycle.

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WHO WILL ADOPT THIS PRESERVATION BICYCLE AND BECOME THE EIGHTH MEMBER OF BBP’S BICYCLE PRESERVATION SOCIETY?