Preservation Bicycle #4: 1983 Diamondback Mean Streak

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This is a 1983 Diamondback Mean Streak vintage mountain bike, as in one of the first Diamondback mountain bikes ever made. This piece of mountain bike history definitely needs some love, but holy crap, look at those lugs, that fork, the Suntour dropouts, THAT BULLMOOSE HANDLEBAR!

This could be the ultimate commuter, a long distance tourer, a great bike camping rig, or a retrogrouch mountain bike. So much freaking potential here! We’re going to charge a little more for this one, but much less than it’s actually worth. The pedals (original Suntour Bear Traps, hanging from the handlebar) and top mount Suntour shifters alone go on Ebay for way more that we’re charging for the complete package. Which is why we’re hoping to find the perfect match to preserve it, ride it, and love it!

PRESERVATION BICYCLE NUMBER #3

MAKE: Diamondback

MODEL: Mean Streak

YEAR/AGE: 83

SIZE: 22’ (FOR SOMEONE 5’6 - 5’10)

ADOPTION FEE: $100

RECOMMENDED REPAIRS:

Ok, the Mean Streak need some love. Some steel wool should take care of the wheels, but you’ll need some tubes and some big fat tires. New cables, cable housing, and a chain. Everything needs degreasing and regreasing. And you’re going to need a saddle. All of these parts and this work can be done at BBP. Maybe in 3 3-hours shifts and probably for less than $150.

To create something off-the-hook amazing, add a front rack with a basket and big saddlebag. Invest in a leather Brooks Saddle, and some beefy tan walk tires. $100 for the bike, $150 for repair parts, $200 for some extra rad stuff and you’ve got the best $450 bicycle ever made!

BICYCLE HISTORY:

Ok, it was designed here in the States, but actually manufactured in Japan with Champion Steel (a very good thing). It has a registration sticker for Oregon State University that expires on 9-30-1986, so we know this Beaver has been all over the Northwest. The rust on the spokes probably means it spend some time closer to the Oregon Coast, which makes me think it’s done a few 50 mile trips back and forth from Corvallis to Newport.

WHAT OTHER STORIES CAN WE DISCOVER FROM THESE PICTURES?

WHO WILL ADOPT THIS PRESERVATION BICYCLE AND BECOME THE FORTH MEMBER OF BBP’S BICYCLE PRESERVATION SOCIETY?