PRESERVATION BICYCLE # 3: 1987-ish MIYATA 100 MIXTE

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This is a 1987 Miyata 100 “Mixte” (it might be a 85, 87, or 88 but probably not a 1989) with limitless potential for creating joyful and sustainable transportation for its future rider. And look at all of those beautiful triangles! Strong beautiful triangles everywhere!

Don’t let the step-through frame fool you, this is not a women’s specific bicycle. The term “Mixte” is pronounced “Meeext” actually means unisex. Mixte bicycles were popular in the 80s and are easy to identify by their double sloping top tube (strong but light). Unfortunately because of these sloping top tubes, they were never able to shake their “women’s bike” association. This is a real shame, because step-through frames are amazing for everyone, especially elderly folks who can’t swing their leg over the back and dudes rocking skinny jeans! So many denim blowouts could have been saved! Where the step-through frame really comes in handy is when you’re carrying large cargo in the rear that makes it even more difficult to swing your leg up and over.

PRESERVATION BICYCLE NUMBER #3

MAKE: Miyata

MODEL: Mixte

YEAR/AGE: 87-ish

SIZE: 50CM (for someone 5’1 - 5’5)

ADOPTION FEE: $40

RECOMMENDED REPAIRS:

New tubes, cables, cable housing, and definitely some classier bar tape. Oh yes, and a lot of degreasing and regreasing. All of these parts and this work can be done at BBP. Maybe in 3-6 hours for less than $100.

Nitto Albatross Swept Back Handlebar

Nitto Albatross Swept Back Handlebar

If you really wanted to class this one up, I’d recommend some upright handlebars with a nice sweepback (see image right). It already comes with the best Suntour stem shifters ever made (see image below), so need crowd up the handlebar with extra cables and levers. And if you switched to 700c wheels (slightly smaller diameter than the stock 27’’) you could lighten things up while making room for a balloonier smooth riding tire. Now you’re looking at a $200 investment, but that’s still a steal!

BICYCLE HISTORY:

Well we don’t have a ton of info here. We know it was made in Japan with Japanese steel, but it was likely originally sold here in the states. It has plenty of “character” worn into it’s red paint, so we know it’s covered some ground. It also has clamps on the rear triangle that indicate a rear rack, so we also know that it’s hauled some gear. If I were to guess, I’d say this was someone’s (probably a woman’s) daily commuter for about 20 years, it’s spend most of its time riding in Boise (or another dry climate), and has carried its fair share of produce home from the farmers market.

WHAT OTHER STORIES CAN WE DISCOVER FROM THESE PICTURES?

WHO WILL ADOPT THIS PRESERVATION BICYCLE AND BECOME THE THIRD MEMBER OF BBP’S BICYCLE PRESERVATION SOCIETY?